Aktuelles

  Retreat of the BMGS segment „Cellular and Molecular Biology“ in Hasselt, Belgium

Retreat des BMGS Segmentes Cellular and Molecular Biology in Hasselt, Belgien

 

gut, liver and friends Seminar mit Prof. Dr. med. Julia Stingl

Vortrag von Prof. Julia Stingl Urheberrecht: Dr. Heike Herbrand Vortrag von Prof. Julia Stingl

On 4thof March 2020 Prof. Julia Stingl, the newly recruited director of the Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, talked about: "The Pharmacological Gut-Liver Interaction: Implications on Personalized Drug Therapy and Dosing". She introduced us in the importance of personalized therapeutics due to an individualized expression of so called “pharmacogenes” which play a big role in drug uptake and metabolization. Beside the patient´s genetics, the microbiota of the patient could have a major impact due to the huge diversity of genes provided by the commensals which can have an important influence on the uptake, bioavailability and processing of drugs.

 

gut, liver and Friends Seminar mit Prof. Dr. Klaus-Peter Janssen

Prof. Dr. Klaus-Peter Janssen und Prof. Thomas Clavel Urheberrecht: Dr. Heike Herbrand Prof. Dr. Klaus-Peter Janssen und Prof. Thomas Clavel

Prof. Dr. Klaus-Peter Janssen from Munich (TUM, Klinikum Rechts der Isar) was our guest at ‘Gut, Liver and Friends’ on February 19th 2020.

Klaus-Peter Janssen´s laboratory has a major interest in studying tumorigenesis in the colon and the impact of the gut microbiota. He shared brand new data obtained from patients and mouse models on the impact of the microbiota on colorectal cancer and experimental liver resection

Publications:

Holtorf A, Conrad A, Holzmann B, Janssen KP. Cell-type specific MyD88 signaling is required for intestinal tumor initiation and progression to malignancy. Oncoimmunology. 2018;7(8):e1466770. Published 2018 Jun 11. doi:10.1080/2162402X.2018.1466770

Franke FC, Müller J, Abal M, et al. The Tumor Suppressor SASH1 Interacts With the Signal Adaptor CRKL to Inhibit Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer. Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018;7(1):33–53. Published 2018 Sep 11. doi:10.1016/j.jcmgh.2018.08.007

Cremonesi E, Governa V, Garzon JFG, et al. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer. Gut. 2018;67(11):1984–1994. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313498

 

Gut, Liver and Friends Seminar mit Prof. Harry Sokol, Gastroenterology Department Saint Antoine Hospital Paris

Harry Sokol während des Vortrages Urheberrecht: Dr. Heike Herbrand Harry Sokol während des Vortrages

On 5thof February 2020 Harry Sokol was our guest speaker, talking about ‘Gut Microbiota in IBD: from description to therapeutic target’. Harry Sokol works at the Gastroenterology Department of Saint Antoine Hospital in Paris. His lab aims at deciphering the mechanisms involved in the crosstalk of host and microbiota crosstalk in health and disease. Harry Sokol shared recent published and unpublished data on prospect of Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

We have started ‘Gut and Friends’ lunch time seminars more than five years ago with a small audience in a correspondingly small room. With today's lecture by Mr. Sokol, we took the opportunity to move our seminar series to a larger auditorium.

Publications:

Sokol, H., Landman, C., Seksik, P. et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation to maintain remission in Crohn’s disease: a pilot randomized controlled study. Microbiome 8, 12 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-020-0792-5

Lavelle A, Hoffmann TW, Pham HP, Langella P, Guédon E, Sokol H. Baseline microbiota composition modulates antibiotic-mediated effects on the gut microbiota and host. Microbiome. 2019 Aug 2;7(1):111. doi: 10.1186/s40168-019-0725-3.

 

Gut & Friends Seminar mit Prof. Emma Wetter Slack, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zürich

Vortrag Prof. Emma Wetter-Slack Urheberrecht: Dr. Heike Herbrand

On November 20th , 2019, our seminar guest Emma Wetter Slack shared her view on gut IgA biology with the audience. She gave a highly informative talk entitled "Interactions between gut bacteria and the mucosal immune system". She presented her group’s newest data on the interactions of IgA and intestinal bacteria and showed preliminary data addressing the role of mucosal T cells in microbiota regulation. Emma Wetter Slack is an expert in the field of IgA biology and her work has profoundly altered our understanding of the mechanisms of immune exclusion of pathogenic bacteria by secretory IgA. Her talk was followed by a ‘Meet the Speaker’ session specifically aimed at young scientists to encourage discussion and scientific exchange.

References:

Moor, Kathrin, Diard, Médéric, Sellin, Mikael E., Felmy, Boas, Wotzka, Sandra Y., Toska, Albulena, Bakkeren, Erik, Arnoldini, Markus, Bansept, Florence, Co, Alma Dal, Völler, Tom, Minola, Andrea, Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca, Agatic, Gloria, Barbieri, Sonia, Piccoli, Luca, Casiraghi, Costanza, Corti, Davide, Lanzavecchia, Antonio, Regoes, Roland R., Loverdo, Claude, Stocker, Roman, Brumley, Douglas R., Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich and Slack, Emma (2017). "High-avidity IgA protects the intestine by enchaining growing bacteria." Nature 544(7651): 498-502.

Enchained growth and cluster dislocation: A possible mechanism for microbiota homeostasis. Florence Bansept, Kathrin Schumann-Moor, Médéric Diard, Wolf-Dietrich Hardt, Emma Slack and Claude Loverdo. PLoS Computational Biology, vol. 15: no. 5, pp. e1006986, San Francisco, CA: Public Library of Science, 2019.

Salmonella persisters promote the spread of antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut. Erik Bakkeren, Jana S. Huisman, Stefan A. Fattinger, Annika Hausmann, Markus Furter, Adrian Egli, Emma Wetter Slack, Mikael E. Sellin, Sebastian Bonhoeffer, Roland Robert Regös, Médéric Diard and Wolf-Dietrich Hardt. Nature, vol. 573: no. 7773, pp. 276-280, London: Nature Publishing Group, 2019.

IgA and the intestinal microbiota: the importance of being specific. Oliver Pabst and Emma Slack E . Mucosal Immunol. 2019 Nov 18. doi: 10.1038/s41385-019-0227-4 [Epub ahead of print].

 

The trithorax protein Ash2l is essential for maintaining adult hematopoiesis

The expression of genes is controlled at various levels, including the modification of core histones. Methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 is associated with open chromatin and gene transcription. This histone modification is dependent on KMT2 methyltransferase complexes, which require several core proteins, including Ash2l, for efficient catalytic activity. We have generated conditional Ash2l alleles, which were inactivated in the hematopoietic system of the adult mouse. This resulted in the loss of differentiated hematopoietic cells due to a proliferation and differentiation stop of stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistically this is paralleled by a loss of methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 and downregulation of hundreds of genes. Thus, Ash2l is required for maintaining the proper development of mature hematopoietic cells and therefore essential for organismal survival.

Reference:

Lüscher-Firzlaff J, Chatain N, Kuo CC, Braunschweig T, Bochyńska A, Ullius A, Denecke B, Costa IG, Koschmieder S, Lüscher B. 2019. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation requires the trithorax protein Ash2l. Scientific Reports 9, 8262.

 

Gut & Friends Seminar with Professor Gérard Eberl, Institute Pasteur, Paris

Gérard Eberl während des gut&friends Vortrags Gérard Eberl während des gut&friends Vortrags

Gérard Eberl hat einen Vortrag über das Thema " Regulation of immunity by neonatal microbiotra" gehalten.

 

Gut & Friends Seminar with Professor Jochen Hühn, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig

Professor Hornef und Professor Hühn Urheberrecht: Heike Herbrand Professor Hornef und Professor Hühn

Gut & Friends Seminar with Prof. Jochen Hühn, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig

On September 4th , 2019, our seminar guest Jochen Hühn has provided fascinating insights into ‘How neonatal infections and microbial colonization affect T cell differentiation’. Jochen Hühn is an expert in the field of T regulatory cells and has been analyzing the influence of tissue conditions for T cell priming for many years. His talk was followed by a ‘Meet the Speaker’ Session specifically aimed at young scientists to encourage discussion and scientific exchange.

References:

Pezoldt J, Pasztoi M, Zou M, Wiechers C, Beckstette M, Thierry GR, Vafadarnejad E, Floess S, Arampatzi P, Buettner M, Schweer J, Fleissner D, Vital M, Pieper DH, Basic M, Dersch P, Strowig T, Hornef M, Bleich A, Bode U, Pabst O, Bajénoff M, Saliba AE, Huehn J. Neonatally imprinted stromal cell subsets induce tolerogenic dendritic cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. Nat Commun. 2018 Sep 25;9(1):3903.

Pasztoi M, Pezoldt J, Beckstette M, Lipps C, Wirth D, Rohde M, Paloczi K, Buzas EI, Huehn J. Mesenteric lymph node stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicles contribute to peripheral de novo induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Eur J Immunol. 2017 Dec;47(12):2142-2152.

 

Studentendiskussion mit Professor Hühn

Studenten Diskussion Urheberrecht: Heike Herbrand Studentendiskussion mit Professor Hühn
 

Studenten beim Vortrag

Studenten während des Vortrags Urheberrecht: Heike Herbrand Studenten während des Vortrags
 

Publication: The trithorax protein Ash2l is essential for maintaining adult hematopoiesis

The trithorax protein Ash2l is essential for maintaining adult hematopoiesis

The expression of genes is controlled at various levels, including the modification of core histones. Methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 is associated with open chromatin and gene transcription. This histone modification is dependent on KMT2 methyltransferase complexes, which require several core proteins, including Ash2l, for efficient catalytic activity. We have generated conditional Ash2l alleles, which were inactivated in the hematopoietic system of the adult mouse. This resulted in the loss of differentiated hematopoietic cells due to a proliferation and differentiation stop of stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistically this is paralleled by a loss of methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 and downregulation of hundreds of genes. Thus, Ash2l is required for maintaining the proper development of mature hematopoietic cells and therefore essential for organismal survival.

Reference

Lüscher-Firzlaff J, Chatain N, Kuo CC, Braunschweig T, Bochyńska A, Ullius A, Denecke B, Costa IG, Koschmieder S, Lüscher B. 2019. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation requires the trithorax protein Ash2l. Scientific Reports 9, 8262.

  Personengruppe auf dem Retreat in Hasselt, Belgien

14. und 15. 2. 2019:
Das zweite Retreat des BMGS Segmentes Cellular and Molecular Biology in Hasselt, Belgien

Annika Schwentker (AG Hornef) und Theresa Streidl (AG Clavel) aus dem Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie der Uniklinik der RWTH organisierten gemeinsam das zweite Retreat des BMGS Segments Molecular and Cellular Biology in der Jugendherberge von Hasselt, Belgien.

Neben interessanten wissenschaftlichen Vorträgen von externen und internen Sprechern wie John Penders (Universität Maastricht), Albert Haas (Universität Bonn) und Ivan Gesteira Costa (Universitätsklinikum der RWTH) über das Darmmikrobiom und die Aufnahme multiresistenter Erreger bei Auslandsreisen, zelluläre Mechanismen des endosomalen Transportes und bioinformatische Ansätze bei der single cell Transkriptionsanalyse wurden während der zwei Tage in verschiedenen Runden die PhD Projekte der beteiligten PhD Studenten untereinander sowie mit den teilnehmenden PIs vorgestellt und diskutiert.

Daneben gab es Workshops zu Themen wie „wissenschaftliche Präsentation“, „Zeitmanagement und Organisation“ und „Richtiges Zitieren“ sowie Informationen zu den formalen Abläufen der Registrierung zum PhD Student und den Angeboten sowohl der Graduiertenschule als auch der Medizinischen Fakultät und Universität.

Beim gemütlichen Beisammensein am Abend konnten die wissenschaftlichen Diskussionen fortgesetzt sowie Kontakte zwischen Studenten verschiedener Arbeitsgruppen geknüpft werden. Auch die PIs hatten Gelegenheit, sich untereinander auszutauschen und zukünftige Aktivitäten und Initiativen zu diskutieren.

Für Presserückfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an:

Uniklinik RWTH Aachen

Dr. Mathias Brandstädter
Tel. +49 241 80-89893

 

02.12.2017: Das erste Retreat des BMGS Segmentes Cellular and Molecular Biology

Prof. Joachim Jankowski organisierte gemeinsam mit Marieke Sternkopf und Sandra Knarren aus dem IMCAR der Uniklinik der RWTH das erste sehr erfolgreiche Retreat des BMGS Segments Molecular and Cellular Biology im Kloster Heidberg in Eupen, Belgien.

Wir diskutierten unsere neue Graduiertenschule, planten zukünftige Aktivitäten und lauschten wissenschaftlichen Vorträgen zu den ADAM Proteasen (Prof. Ludwig), ADP Ribosylierung (Prof. Lüscher), der intestinalen Interaktion zwischen Bakterien und dem Wirt (Prof. Hornef), Stammzellen (Prof. Zenke) und dem Plasmaproteom (Prof. Jankowski).

Außerdem hörten wir interessante Vorträge zu Forschungsförderungsmitteln und -stiftungen, dem Schreiben von Anträgen, der Forschung in der Industrie und der akademischen Forschung, der Karriereentwicklung, und weiteren mit dem Leben als PhD Student/Inn assoziierten Themen zu. Schließlich genossen wir auch noch ein vorzügliches Orgelkonzert, besuchten das Kloster Val-Dieu und verbrachten einen unterhaltsamen Abend mit Yahtzee Wettbewerb.

Für Presserückfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an:

Uniklinik RWTH Aachen

Dr. Mathias Brandstädter
Tel. +49 241 80-89893

 

11.09.2017: Kick-off Treffen der Biomedical Graduate School (BMGS) Aachen

Das Segment "Cellular and Molecular Biology" der Biomedical Graduate School (BMGS) Aachen traf sich am 11 September im Universitätsklinikum zu einem ersten Kick-Off Treffen.

Die beteiligten PhD Studenten präsentierten ihre Projekte in einem Science Slam Wettbewerb. Prof. Wolfram Antonin, neu berufener Direktor des Instituts für Biochemie und Molekulare Zellbiologie führte in sein Forschungsgebiet bei einem Vortrag ein.